Day 6 - Getting What You Want Explained (Text Lesson)

Hindi Speaking Courses

In this lesson, you'll review the grammar and vocabulary you learned in the previous audio lesson. You'll learn even more details about how to order in a restaurant, ask for help, and get assistance in an emergency

Taiyaar? Are you ready?

Getting What You Want

The three most important verbs in Hindi for you to learn are: I need, I want, and I would like.

Day 6 - Elementary Hindi

Jarurat hai. I need.

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Chaahiye. I want.

Day 6 - Elementary Hindi

Mai chaahungaa.(if you're a male) I would like.

Day 6 - Elementary Hindi

Mai chaahungee.(if you're a female) I would like.

Use “jarurat hai” to tell people that you need a pair of shoes, need information, or need to find a bathroom!

Use “chaahiye” to tell people that you want a room in a hotel, want to go shopping, or want to do a tour.

Use “mai chaahungaa” (f. mai chaahungee) to order food at a restaurant, offer an opinion about what you would like to do, or talk about what you would like to do someday.

Take a look at the conversation you learned in the previous lesson of the course to see how these three important phrases are used.

Mahilaa: Mujhe madad chaahiye.
Purushh: Kis tarah ki?
Mahilaa: Mai kuchchh peenaa chahatee hoon.
Purushh: Kya peenaa chaahate ho?
Mahilaa: Mai ek kap kaafee pasand karungee.
Purushh: doodh ya cheenee ke saath?
Mahilaa: dono ke saath deejiye.
Purushh: Theek hai. Mai ek kap chai pasand karungaa.

In English, this conversation goes as follows:

Mahilaa: I want help.
Purushh: With what?
Mahilaa: I want something to drink.
Purushh: What do you want?
Mahilaa: I would like a (cup of) coffee.
Purushh: With sugar or milk?
Mahilaa: With both, please.
Purushh: Set. I want a (cup of) tea.

How to Order/Ask for Something in Hindi

When you’re ordering food at a café or restaurant, it’s only polite to tell the waiter what you’d like to order … rather than what you want. When traveling in a foreign country, you don’t want to be seen as demanding! So it’s good to get into the habit of using “mai chaahungaa” (f. mai chaahungee).

Literally, “mai chaahungaa” (f. mai chaahungee) means, “I would like.”

I would like to have the chicken.

I would like to have a coffee.

It is often used to request something in a polite way. For example:

Day 6 - Elementary Hindi

Mai aaj raat ke liye ek kamaraa chaahungee. I’d like a room for tonight.

Day 6 - Elementary Hindi

Mai murgaa ke sath salaad chahungaa. I’d like the chicken with a salad.

Day 6 - Elementary Hindi

Mai do kap kaafee chaahungee. I’d like two coffees.

When the waiter returns your order, it’s only polite to add, “Thank you.” 

Day 6 - Elementary Hindi

Dhanya-vaad. Thank you.

How to Order/Ask for Something to Drink

Ordering "peya", or something to drink, is one of the most basic ordering experiences and is a good way to try out your Hindi. Imagine you are in a cafetería, or a coffee shop. What will you order and how will you say it? Here are some options. 

Day 6 - Elementary Hindi

mai .......chaahungaa. (if you're a male) I’d like.

Day 6 - Elementary Hindi

mai .......chaahungee. (if you're a female) I’d like.

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ek (kap) kaafee. I’d like a (cup of) coffee

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ek instant kaafee. I’d like an instant coffee.

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kaafee dudh ke saath. I’d like a coffee with milk.

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kaafee dudh aur cheene ke saath . I’d like a coffee with milk and sugar.

Day 6 - Elementary Hindi

ek (kap) chai. I’d like a (cup of) tea.

Day 6 - Elementary Hindi

chai dudh ke saath. I’d like a tea with milk.

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chai nimbu ke saath. I’d like a tea with lemon.

If you want to streamline your Hindi even further, you don’t actually have to tell a waiter, “I would like a cup of coffee.” You could just say, “A coffee, please.”  

Day 6 - Elementary Hindi

ek kaafee dijiye. A coffee, please.

Please note that request is included in Hindi verb "dijiye" and you do not need to say Hindi word "kripaya" for please. You will find many such verbs where request is inluded in the words itself, such as 

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lijiye please take

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aaeeye please come

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jaaeeye please go

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chaliye please move

 

Emergency! I Need Help!

If you are going to spend any time in a Hindi-speaking country, you need to know how to ask for help. So memorize this essential word: 

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madad help

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sahaa-yataa help

If you don’t remember any other words from this section, remember that if you’re in trouble you can always shout, “madad!” and be understood. 

If the help you need isn’t of an essential nature, here are the two most useful phrases you can have at your disposal. 

Day 6 - Elementary Hindi

Meri madad kijiye. Please help me.

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Kya aap madad kar sakate hain? Can you help me?

If you need help with something, just add the thing you need help with in the beginning of either of the above phrases. Look at the following sentences.  

Day 6 - Elementary Hindi

Saamaan le jaane mein meri madad kijiye. Please help me in carrying the luggage.

Day 6 - Elementary Hindi

Kya suitcase le jaane mein meri madad kar sakate hain? Can you help me in carrying the suitcases?

Let’s see how you could put these words into use. Imagine that you have just checked into a hotel. The bellboy asks you if you need help with your bags. 

Day 6 - Elementary Hindi

Bellboy: Suitcase le jaane mein madad chaahiye? Do you need help in carrying your suitcase?

Day 6 - Elementary Hindi

You: Madad ki jarurat nahi, dhanya-vaad. No, I do not need help. Thank you.

Did you understand that? You told the bellboy that you didn’t need help, thank you. Or, you could have just said, 

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Nahi, dhanya-vaad. No, thanks.

It’s nice to be able to ask for help in these circumstances, but in real emergencies you will need something a bit stronger than, “I need help.” Here are three powerful words that will catch everyone’s attention.

Day 6 - Elementary Hindi

Madad-Madad! (Also Sahaa-yataa) Help! Help!

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Chor-Chor! Thief! Thief!

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Aag-Aag! Fire!Fire!

Before you travel to any Hindi-speaking country, I recommend that you commit these three words to memory. They will be your safety net if you get caught in a dangerous situation. 

Well, that’s it for today’s lesson.

 

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