Day 7 - Beginning Numbers

Hindi Speaking Courses

Numbers are so important. Without being able to understand Hindi numbers, you won't be able to understand the time that your friends agreed to meet, the date, your room number, or even--and most importantly--the price of any of the items you buy!

Numbers occur everywhere in conversations. Fortunately, they're easy to understand once you know the basic numbers from 0 to 20, which you'll learn in this lesson. It may sound easy--that's only 21 new words after all--but spend the time reviewing. In the next lesson on advanced numbers, you'll need to know the basic numbers so well that you don't think twice about them.

Let’s get started!

Here is today's lesson on Numbers in Hindi. Do remember that Hindi numbers follow decimal system.

Use the controls below to play, stop and pause the audio track. Please note that these are NOT conversations.

Day 1 - Primary Hindi

 

numbers
counting

0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
sa-nkh-yaa
gi-na-tee

shunya
ek
dow
teen
chaar
paanch
chheh
saat
aath
nauv
das
gyaarah
baarah
terah
chaudah
pandrah
solah
satrah
athaarah
unnees
bees

Ordinal Numbers in Hindi

Day 1 - Primary Hindi

 

First
Second
Third
Fourth
Fifth
Sixth
Seventh
Eighth
Ninth
Tenth
Eleventh
Twelfth
Thirteenth
Fourteenth
Fifteenth
Sixteenth
Seventeenth
Eighteenth
Nineteenth
Twentieth
pahalaa
dusaraa
tisaraa
chauthaa
paanchavaa
chhathaa
saatavaa
aathavaa
nauvaa
dasavaa
gyaarahavaa
baarahavaa
terahavaa
chaudahavaa
pandrahavaa
solahavaa
satrahavaa
athaarahavaa
uneesavaa
beesavaa

Here's some use of Hindi numbers in a conversation.

Day 1 - Primary Hindi

 

How many do you want? (polite)

just one.

How many bread rolls do you want? (polite)

I want one bread roll.

How many tickets do you want? (polite)

I want three tickets.

How many siblings do you have? (polite)

I have two siblings.

Kitane chaahiye?

sirf ek.

Kitane bread rolls chaahiye?

Mai ek bread roll chahataa hoon.

Kitane tikat chaahiye?

Mai teen tikat chahataa hoon.

Kitane bhai-behan hain?

Mere dow bhai-behan hain.

Day 1 - Primary Hindi

 

1 + 1 = 2 (One plus one equals two.)

1.5 (one point five)

2.5 (two point five)

A quarter less

1.75 (one point seven five)

A quarter more

1.25 (one point two five)

ek aur ek dow hote hain.

ek dasmalav paanch (also dedha)

dow dasmalav paanch (also dhaai)

paune

paune dow (also ek dasmalav saat paanch)

savaa

savaa (also ek dasmalav dow paanch)

I hope this helps you remember these important Hindi number words. You can't learn Hindi without getting the basics of the numbers from 0 to 20 down. And, best of all, once you are completely familiar with these numbers, it will be a snap to figure out how to say even advanced numbers, like 250 or 2005.

 

Practice Now!

Here are some exercises to practice what you have learned.

Exercise 1-"Beginning Numbers"

(a) What comes before Hindi number: teen, saat, baarah, solah, unees ?
(b) What comes after Hindi number: teen, saat, baarah, solah, unees ?
(c) Which is the number between : teen--paanch--saat--nau--gyaarah--terah--pandrah

Exercise 2-"Beginning Numbers"

(a) What is the number if you add these two: shunya+paanch, nau+chheh, das+chaar, das+saat
(b) What is the number if you subtract these two: saat-paanch, nau-chheh, das-chaar, bees-saat
(c) At what marking is the short hand of a time-clock at: 1 o'clock, 9 o'clock, 12 o'clock

How well you do?

Now, take a few minutes to score your answers.

That's all for today's lesson.

 

Click here to see answers.

Exercise 1.

(a) dow, chheh, gyaarah, pandrah, athaarah
(b) chaar, aath, terah, satrah, bees
(c) -chaar--chheh--aath--das--baarah--chaudah-

Exercise 2.

(a) paanch, pandrah, chaudah, satrah
(b) dow, teen, chheh, terah
(c) pahalaa, nauvaa, baarahavaa

If there's anything you didn't understand clearly, review it now.

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